Complete Energy Profile in Minutes. That’s What We Said A Long Time Ago!

The Building Advisor got fat and happy over Thanksgiving (instead of writing a blog post), and…well…a bit ornery.

“When you look at reducing the carbon footprint in the United States, there’s a huge bottleneck right now, and that is the way we assess buildings for energy efficiency opportunities,” Bennett Fisher remarked to Boston.com’s blog, Innovation Economy, this week.

Fisher cofounded a company called Retroficiency, maker of software to evaluate energy savings potential via a web-based program. (Sound familiar?) Since forming in 2009 the company has recently become a media darling, gathering writeups recently from GigaOm and Martin LaMonica due to another round of angel investment funding and, well, pedigree. [Note to Martin: BuildingAdvice was putting buildings “on a diet” way back in 2009 too. See picture.]

“…the way we assess buildings today is that we send people in to count lightbulbs and look at HVAC units,” Fisher was quoted as saying. “That can cost tens of thousands of dollars per facility.”

As one of those people counting lightbulbs and looking at HVAC units, what do you think? Maybe you didn’t go to MIT, but perhaps you know a thing or two about energy savings?

HVAC systems use the most energy of any system in a building. Therefore, looking at them? Not such a bad idea.

On the other hand, Pike Research gave us something to smile – and think – about. This week, the cleantech market research firm issued a report predicting that HVAC systems will double to become a $6.4 billion business by 2017. “Energy Efficient Buildings: Global Outlook” predicts the building energy efficiency market will soar more than 50 percent between in the next six years, rising to $103.5 billion.

“As we’ve been saying for many years at The Building Advisor GreenBiz.com, building energy efficiency may not be sexy, but it is big business.”

More good news: ACCA (Air Conditioning Contractors of America) is relaunching its print publication, Contractor Excellence. Rather, “actually transforming into a whole new magazine,” according to The Building Advisor’s sources. The new glossy/web edition, IE3 Magazine, will set sail in January.You might be able to get more out of ACCA SVP Kevin Holland by following him on Twitter at @acca_kevin.

Leave a Reply